Science Alert: Living with spinal cord injury – long-term perspective

Posted by Maria Åberg Håkansson, May 30 2017

Find me on:

Intermittent catheterization seems to be key to improving quality of life when living with a spinal cord injury. New research has confirmed that the therapy can increase the number of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) by 93% and at the same time reduce urinary incontinence by 38%.

wellspect-science-alert-blog-intermittent-catheterization-ic.jpg

A similar trend is seen in another new study that looked at health conditions among people with long-term spinal cord injury. Life satisfaction was in general high and related to marital status and bladder function, but not to gender, age, or time since injury.

Even though several new reports support a high quality of life among people with spinal cord injury, there are continued problems. A systematic review has studied bladder cancer occurrence among people with spinal cord injury. The authors found the prevalence to be high and it was concluded that bladder cancer is more common among people with spinal cord injury than in the general population. Whether or not urinary tract infections (UTIs) are related to cancer, chronic UTI is also of major concern for people with spinal cord injury. Researchers are trying to find new strategies to approach and reduce the risk of this problem. This month, a study reports results from an evaluation of a long-term antibiotic treatment regimen.

Download Publication Highlight


Impact of clean intermittent catheterization on quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic urinary incontinence.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28407301

Author and Origin

Svihra J, Krhut J, Zachoval R, Svihrova V, Luptak J. Slovak Republic

Summary

Observational prospective study in 229 individuals with spinal cord injury practicing intermittent catheterization. Quality of life was followed for a 6-month period using a standardized questionnaire (ICIQ-UI SF).

Conclusions

Intermittent catheterization increased the number of quality-adjusted life years by 93.5% and decreased urinary incontinence by 38.5%.

Comments

Study quantifying the quality of life gain associated with intermittent catheterization among people with spinal cord injury.

This publication is described further in the highlight section.

  


Secondary Health Conditions, Activity Limitations, and Life Satisfaction in Older Adults With Long-Term Spinal Cord Injury.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647215

Author and Origin 

Jörgensen S, Iwarsson S, Lexell J. Sweden

Summary

Observational survey of health conditions, activity limitations, and life satisfaction in 123 individuals with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI).

Conclusions

Bowel-related and bladder-related problems were reported by 32% and 44%, respectively. Activity limitations were moderate and in general a relatively high level of physical independence and life satisfaction were reported.

Comments

Study observing health conditions among people with long-term spinal cord injury. Life satisfaction was for example related to marital status and bladder function, but not to gender, age, or time since injury.

  

Bladder cancer in individuals with spinal cord injuries: a meta-analysis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27824057

Author and Origin 

Gui-Zhong L, Li-Bo M. China

Summary

Review of occurrence of bladder cancer in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The review included 18 studies.

Conclusions

The incidence of bladder cancer is 6‰ and seems to be higher for people with SCI than in the general population. Long-term indwelling catheter users seems to be at the highest risk of bladder cancer.

Comments

Review investigating occurrence of bladder cancer among people with spinal cord injury.

 


Chronic urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord lesions - biofilm infection with need for long-term antibiotic treatment.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28407430

Author and Origin 

Tofte N, Nielsen AC, Trøstrup H, Andersen CB, Von Linstow M, Hansen B, Biering-Sørensen F, Høiby N, Moser C. Denmark

Summary

Observational retrospective study of the effect of long-term treatment with antibiotics in 129 individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic urinary tract infection (UTI).

Conclusions

The recommended long-term treatment using antibiotics seemed effective in reducing chronic UTI, but further verification is needed in randomized controlled trials.

Comments

Study observing the effect of long-term antibiotics on reducing chronic UTI among people with SCI.


 Download Publication Highlight


This blog post is an extract of the Science Alert from May 2017 (76070-USX-1705)

Topics: Science Alert, Spinal cord injury, catheterization, Intermittent Catheterization