Science Alert: Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) - Beyond the injury

Posted by Maria Åberg Håkansson, August 15 2017

Initial management after spinal cord injury is crucial in saving lives. It is often characterized by early transfer to specialized centers and early initiation of treatments.

Long-term management is, however, almost as important. New research focuses on both of these and stresses the importance of early prevention of chronic complications, as these are common health problems affecting the quality of live for people living with a spinal cord injury

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Topics: Science Alert, Spinal cord injury, sci

Science Alert: Spinal Cord Injury – beyond the injury

Posted by Sofi Sigvardsson, February 21 2017

Health problems are common after a spinal cord injury and they have been found to have a great impact on day to day life. A recent publication describes the extent of this impact and also lists the most frequent problems, such as bladder and bowel regulation.

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Topics: Science Alert, Spinal cord injury, sci

Kissinger's Story Part Two: A positive outlook after a SCI

Posted by Kissinger Deng, December 23 2016

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Facing new challenges and uncertainties after sustaining a spinal chord injury have emboldened Kissinger's outlook; in this post, the paralympian describes how his experiences have shaped his attitude.

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Topics: sci, Kissinger Deng

Sex after injury or illness – part 2

Posted by Anna Westberg, November 3 2016

"Don't make sex so difficult". Dorthe Forsell is a sex therapist at the Neurology Department at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. In the second and final part of the interview, she wishes that more people could take a more relaxed and playful approach to sex.

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Topics: CIC, MS, sci, Sexuality

Sexuality after injury or illness – part 1

Posted by Anna Westberg, October 27 2016

After an injury or illness that reduces physical capabilities, your sex life may face new challenges. It takes time to adapt to your changed body. But the sex drive is not lost – it's there, like for all other people.

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Topics: CIC, MS, sci, Sexuality

Kent Revedal: How I found the solution to my SCI related bowel problems

Posted by Paul Wilkinson, October 20 2016

One consequence of a broken spinal cord is loss of bladder and bowel control. 

Kent Revedal suffered a spinal cord injury in a motorcycle accident and he desperately searched for a bowel regime to avoid public 'accidents'. He found one! This is Kent's own story, in three films, about how that happened. 

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Topics: TAI, sci

6 tips and tricks to succeed with Transanal Irrigation (TAI)

Posted by Kent Revedal, October 13 2016

”As easy as one, two, three...” Everywhere we hear or see commercials about technical things. We hear that it's so easy, almost intuitive. What many of us have learned – sometimes the hard way is that if it sounds too good to be true, it is too good to be true... Some things need to take time and practise.

 

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Topics: TAI, Transanal irrigation, sci

User perspective of TAI: Lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals is causing needless suffering

Posted by Helene Klasson, September 22 2016

Our user panel TellUs gives us a lot of useful information. For example that 82% of the people with Spinal Cord Injury have problems with their bowel. But there is still a stigma attached. Only 29% of the panel members were asked about their bowel by a healthcare professional, while 68% wanted to be asked... Sometimes the knowledge is poor, and sometimes it's just hard to get over the embarrassment.

Our guest blogger Kent Revedal has a clear stand on this matter - this is his direct plea to the healthcare professionals out there!

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Topics: Spinal cord injury, TAI, Transanal irrigation, sci

Improving SCI care in Nepal

Posted by Helene Klasson, September 15 2016

Suffering a Spinal Cord Injury is a devastating and life-altering event for anyone, but in developing countries with limited healthcare systems, it’s even more fatal. We talked to Mandira Baniya, Nursing Supervisor at the Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Center in Nepal.

Mandira has performed a unique study on intermittent catheterization in Nepal. Among other remarkable findings, her study states that 96% of the participants reuse their disposable catheters, and that 73% don’t have accessible toilets.

Find out more about Mandira Baniya and her study in this blog post!

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Topics: CIC, sci